Families and Family Policies in Sweden: My Book Chapter

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A year ago I received notice that the book Handbook of Family Policies Across the Globe would be coming out in the summer of 2013. I was so elated, as Disa Bergnehr and I had spent time researching and writing a chapter of this book entitled Families and Family Policies in Sweden.

 

And then the book arrived and has been sitting on my bookshelf ever since, pulling it out to find sources or pretend to show-off by having my name in a book. But that’s because I know the material.

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The information in my book chapter is highly important. The chapter consists of Sweden’s family policies, ranging from domestic abuse to same-sex marriage to children’s rights to parental leave.

Anyone wanting to know more about Sweden and how it operates can easily read this chapter and get a nice overview of the benefits and struggles within Swedish family policy.

To see the abstract click here or read below.

To read an unpublished version of this book chapter click here.

To read my official book chapter and learn about all of the family policies across the globe, you can purchase the book here. The book includes reviews from 28 countries around the globe and from every continent (minus Antarctica).

Abstract:

Sweden is known as a social welfare state, whereby the people who reside in Sweden are entitled to certain public benefits at little or no cost to the individual. Over the past century, Sweden has reshaped its culture, growing from one of the poorest nations in Europe to a flourishing country that others emulate, especially with respect to their family policies. Sweden has developed several foundational family policies that have helped to encourage equality, while establishing a sense of individuality. Sweden has created similar rights for cohabiters/married couples, as well as for same-sex/opposite-sex couples. Parents receive a generous parental leave package, flexible employment choices, and there is a low gender wage gap, while children receive high-quality childcare, free health care, free dental care, free mental health services, and a substantial child welfare program. Swedish family policies encourage both parents to work and to help each other with household and childcare tasks. Despite the public benefits that Sweden provides for mothers, fathers, and children, there is still a need for further improvements regarding policies on domestic violence, poverty, and child welfare. Assessments of Sweden’s family policies are discussed.

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