2016 Research Year in Review: Grants, Publications, Citations, and Media Attention

So it’s September 2017, and I’m just now getting around to my 2016 yearly review 🙂 I guess being off on parental leave all year certainly takes its toll on free-time and how I allocate that time.

Luckily, I made screenshots on January 1st of various markers to better record my early review.

To see what I’ve accomplished this year, I want to go back and see what I did last year for comparison purposes. Luckily I can click on this link to remind myself. Marking my first full year as a postdoc, 2016 was a great year!

My single biggest research accomplishment was that I secured my very first research grant! I applied for a gender-focused research grant through Stockholm’s Läns Landsting (County Council). The grant is for 500,000 SEK for two years (250,000 SEK per year). So while not a huge grant, it was very exciting to receive my first grant. And this grant allows me to continue my father research.

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In 2017, Stockholm county will implement a new father-only visit when the child is three-to-five months old. I received the grant, along with co-applicant, Dr. Malin Bergström, to evaluate the implementation, as well as the familial outcomes of this community-based intervention.

While I had some temporary postdoc positions in 2015 with Child Health and Parenting (CHAP) at Uppsala University and at the Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS) at Stockholm University, in 2016, I started a 100% position in Child and Adolescent Public Health Epidemiology Group, Department of Public Health at Karolinska Institute under Dr. Finn Rasmussen. However, wanting to continue my research with Dr. Malin Bergström at CHESS on fathers in the Swedish child health field, I negotiated an 80-20 split.

Finn hired me to run a Job Seeking intervention for young (18-24) high school dropouts who were currently seeking employment, among other register-based research. This project took a dramatic turn before I even started–instead of working with Arbetsförmedlingen, we would now need to run the project ourselves, meaning we would make the program online. Similarly, we needed to device a whole new manual, as some collaborators from Finland, with their School2Work program, fell through.

So I started working on this project from scratch throughout the year, in collaboration with Finn and Dr. Ata Ghaderi.

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Publications were still ongoing however. In 2016, I had five publications:

  1. Wells MB. Literature review shows that fathers are still not receiving the support they want and need from Swedish child health professionals. Acta Paediatrica. 2016;105(9):1014-23.
  2. Wells MB, Sarkadi A, Salari R. Mothers’ and fathers’ attendance in a community-based universally offered parenting program in Sweden. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2015;44:274-80.
  3. Wells MB, Lang SN. Supporting Same-Sex Mothers in the Nordic Child Health Field: A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-synthesis of the Most Gender Equal Countries. Journal of Clinical Nursing. 2016;25(23-24):3469-83.
  4. Bergström M, Wells MB, Söderblom M, Ceder S, Demner E. Projektet Pappa på BVC: Barnhälsovården i Stockholms län 2013-2015. Stockholms län landsting: 2016.
  5. Wellander L, Wells MB, Feldman I. Does Prevention Pay? Costs and Potential Cost-savings of School Interventions Targeting Children with Mental Health Problems. Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics. 2016;19(2):91-101.

Technically, #2 came out in December of 2015, and therefore I reported it last year. In addition, #4 is a Swedish report, not a peer-review article. So I had three new peer-review articles published in 2016; two of which were meta-sythenses. While many postdocs may have more publications in a year, I was quite proud for two reasons: 1) it takes a PhD student four years to publish 3 papers and one manuscript, so having recently received my PhD the year before, I liked the idea of doing a “PhD” in one year and 2) I just had my first child in January 2016, and so it was a hectic year with a nice parenting learning curve on top of juggling full time work and commuting from Uppsala to Stockholm daily.

I took a course on how to conduct Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses, but quickly learned that most studies completed in the child health field are qualitative in nature. Therefore, I independently learned about meta-syntheses and meta-ethnographies, and then completed two articles using these methods. I was very proud of these articles because 1) I learned a method and completed it on my own (for one of the articles) and 2) I was able to contribute a larger voice to how parents are and are not supported in the Nordic and Swedish child health fields, respectively.

It wasn’t only me who was proud–apparently other researchers were also proud. For example, Dr. Hugo Lagercrantz, the editor of Acta Paediatrica, wrote about my findings in his “highlights in this issue”. Having published in Acta Paediatrica a couple of times before this, it was cool to see my research being highlighted.

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But, then they invited Dr. Sven Bremberg to write an editorial on why we should “Support fathers in the child health field“, where he springboarded his editorial based off of my article. That was super cool! To see a well-known researcher highlighting why your research is important and necessary. Boom!

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Sweden also wanted to get in on the conversation!

While I had had a few interviews before, I had my 15 minutes of fame after publishing these back-to-back literature reviews, although much more notoriety and focus was on fathers, rather than same-sex mothers, sadly.

Initially vetenskapsradio (science radio–sort of the Swedish NPR radio station) interviewed me, paying particular attention to my findings on the ways fathers are treated throughout the Swedish child health field. It was a really pleasant experience, even though I desperately struggled to say one or two sentences in Swedish.

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After that news story broke, I not only had friends calling, texting, and Facebooking messages to me saying they heard me on the radio (I didn’t even know people listened to vetenskapsradio), but also TT, a news reporting agency similar to the Associated Press, picked up the story and re-reported it (without talking to me). This meant that the story was in basically every Swedish paper, from national papers to small local ones.

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Newspaper

By the afternoon, I had received a phone call from Rapport; I was going to be on the national evening news. That was exciting!

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And then my day long fame had ended….until I met a father at a park three weeks later, and he recognized me from the news report. That was a cool feeling!

My citations also significantly grew. In 2015, I had 74 citations, while at the start of January 2016, I had 118, according to my ScholarGoogle page. My h-index increased from 5 to a 6, while my i10-index increased from 2-5.

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ResearchGate numbers also grew. In 2015, I had 1066 reads and in 2016 I had 2310. ResearchGate however has far fewer reads than the publications website and the number of citations ResearchGate finds is considerably lower than ScholarGoogle or even PubMed. Moreover, they keep changing their metrics, so it’s hard to compare year to year, but my ResearchGate score went from a 16.87 to 20.02.

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I have also been able to do a bit of teaching, although not nearly enough. For example, I have given lectures in 1) Sexual and Reproductive Health I (a course for midwives in Women’s and Children’s Health), where I talked about the importance of involving fathers in the child health field and 2) How to Conduct a Literature Review and Meta-analysis mainly for PhD students/postdocs in Public Health, where I talked about conducting a meta-synthesis.

I was however also invited to give a talk at “Mödra- och barnhälsovårdens gemensamma studieeftermiddag” where again, I discussed fathers in the Swedish child health field.

Lastly, I helped to write a debate article that was printed in Svenska Dagbladet, a major Swedish newspaper on supporting fathers.

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While I never heard from the public on this issue, I did upset a colleague by participating in this debate article. I guess you just can’t please everyone.

 

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