2017 Research Year in Review: Meeting the Minimum Docent Qualifications

As outlined in the Docent regulations:
“The title of docent is a nationally well known and recognised indicator of scientific and pedagogical expertise…Obtaining a docentur implies that the holder has achieved a degree of independence such that he or she can lead, supervise and evaluate research and academic instruction…‘Docent’ is an academic title that by tradition confers venia docendi, that is ‘the right to teach’ and supervise on all levels of the university; however, the institution of docentur is also rooted in scientific expertise.”
To achieve the title of docent (associate professor), there are three main criteria:

  • 5 weeks of pedagogy courses
  • 15 or more publications
    • Especially helpful is demonstrating independence i
      • e.g. not publishing with your PhD supervisor
      • e.g. being last author
  • 120 hours of classroom teaching
    • Teaching needs to be within the last 6 years
      • So all of my US teaching, where I accumulated hundreds of hours now no longer count
    • Preparing lectures, grading, etc. do not count for teaching hours
    • Teaching to undergraduate students, graduate students, and clinicians do count as teaching hours
    • Supervising master student theses also count
      • Only 60 hours of teaching can be supervision hours

In 2017, I started my second full year as a postdoc in the Department of Public Health at Karolinska Institute. However, in practice, I worked relatively little in 2017, as I took parental leave from January thru August, working only 40% during that time period.

Pedagogy Courses
I worked while on parental leave, primarily to take an online course needed for docent entitled Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (Distance). This is a full-time five-week pedagogy course that takes place online over the span of several months. It worked out really well for me, as many assignments were done individually, on my own time.

Once I came back from parental leave, I also took another online course called Open Networked Learning, which accounts for two full weeks of pedagogy. Here we learned about different open sources one can use when teaching distance courses, as well as ways to make your classroom more interactive.

Furthermore, I took the Web Course for Supervisors 2017 course. This only took a couple of hours to complete, but it went over the legal rules one must follow when directing a PhD student.

Since you need five weeks of pedagogy to become docent, and I now have over 7 weeks, I have met this criteria.

Publications
I also used my parental leave-working time to finish up a few articles, as I didn’t want to leave co-authors waiting for eight months.

As such, I was able to publish four new articles in 2017:

This brings my total publications in peer-reviewed journals to 15! Meaning that I have enough publications, barely, to apply for docent. The Head Start article marks my third sole authored paper, where now I have sole authored a qualitative paper, a quantitative paper, and a literature review/meta-synthesis. Hopefully these papers can show my ability to work independently and via using different methodologies.

Even though I was off from working for a good chunk of the year, apparently people were still reading and citing my previously published researched.

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According to ScholarGoogle, in 2016, I had a total of 116 citations, but by the end of 2017, I had 194. My h-index also increased from a 6 to a 9 and my i-index from a 5 to a 9. However, my citations for 2016 and 2017 were relatively similar with 54 and 57 citations, respectively.

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My ResearchGate numbers also increased. I now have a ResearchGate score of 23.01, which apparently means that my score is higher than 75% of other users.

In 2016, I had a total of 2310 reads, while in 2017, I had 4726 reads. Of course ResearchGate comes with plenty of caveats, such as the fact that most researchers go to the actual journals website rather than ResearchGate to find articles to read. However it’s easy to read the numbers off of ResearchGate, so that’s what I use. On this website it is clear to see that my book chapter Families and Family Policies in Sweden has a total of 1276 reads, making it by far my most read publication from ResearchGate.

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Teaching & Supervision

I was able to do a bit of teaching in 2017, especially in the fall. While I had a few hours here and there, such as in Brain Development or Sexual for Psychologists and Reproductive Health for Midwifery students, my main group of teaching hours came from giving guest lectures in the Epidemiology masters track in a course called Applied Epidemiology 3- Methods for outcome Evaluation of Public Health interventions. I gave lectures on 1) Overview of Study Design in Public Health Outcome Evaluations, 2) Planning the Evaluation, and 3) Evaluating the Implementation of a Community-wide New Father Visit at the Swedish Child Health Centers. In addition, I peer audited the course leader. I also gave a day-long lecture for all masters students in Public Health at KI (Epi + Health Economic) in a course called Theory, Practice, and Ethics.

In addition to teaching, I also supervised four midwifery students as they completed two theses. Two of these were in the spring of 2017, while the other two were in the fall of 2017.

  1. Saga Fogelström and Anna Björsson (2017). Department of Women’s and Children’s Health. Tänk om hon dör och jag blir ensam kvar: En intervjustudie över blivande pappors förlossningsrädsla (What if she dies and leaves me all alone: An interview based study of fathers’ fear of childbirth). I am a co-supervisor.
  2. Michaela Modin Asper and Nino Hallén (2017). Department of Public Health. Postpartum depression screening for fathers: A cost-benefit analysis in Stockholm Sweden. I am a co-supervisor.
  3. Emmeli Vallin and Hanna Nestander (2017). Department of Women’s and Children’s Health. Tänk om hon dör: Mäns upplevelser vid komplikationer under förlossning. (What if she dies: Men’s experiences in complications during childbirth). I am the main supervisor.
  4. Sofia Kittmark and Matias Garzon (2017). Department of Women’s and Children’s Health. Same-sex mothers’ views of the Swedish child health centers: A qualitative study. I am a co-supervisor.

The theses from Women’s and Children’s Health are worth 15 credits (10 weeks), while the one from Public Health is worth 30 credits (20 weeks) for students. The supervisor receives 15 hours of teaching for every 10 weeks of thesis work. Therefore, I have (15/2)+(30/2)+15+(15/2) = 45 hours of supervision.

Theses 2-4 are currently being revised for publication! So perhaps more news on them in the 2018 year in review 🙂

Therefore, in total, I have 62 hours of classroom teaching time, as well as 45 hours of supervision time. Thus, I am just shy of the 120 teaching hours needed for docent.

Other Events

  • I presented at the Nordic Marcé Society for Perinatal Mental Health in Stockholm. The talk was entitled Swedish Child Health Nurses’ Mental Health Support to Mothers and Fathers in 2004 and 2014.
  • My colleagues presented our research findings at Värna våra yngsta: Späda barns rätt till hälsa och utveckling in Stockholm. The talk was called Dialogsamtal med föräldrar om alkohol för att upptäcka barn i riskmiljöer.
  • I was interviewed by Alexander von Schuppler for Region Skåne’s monthly newsletter on the supports fathers want/need in the Swedish child health field.

 

 

 

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